Norwegian Information Security Lecture

NISlectures is a free monthly event addressing current issues in information security. The lectures are streamed live (from approximately 10 minutes before the lecture streaming starts, connect to online streaming). After the lecture recordings will be made available online (see individual lectures). Some of the lectures have also been made available as hyper interactive presentations (HIP).For more information on the series of NISlectures please contact Head of IIK Nils Kalstad Svendsen (nils.svendsen@ntnu.no).

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NISlecture 2018/1 (26.01.2017, 12.15-13.00 in K105)

Title: Defending academics from the cyber reality since 1.1.2017

Speaker: Christoffer Hallstensen and Gaute Wangen , NTNU Gjøvik

Abstract: The NTNU digital security section (DS) and Security Operations Centre (SOC) was officially established 1.1.2017 and is the largest security section in academic Norway. Since being established, DS has been actively working on improving cyber and information security at the university. DS is primarily working in two domains, operative security and security management. The section also has a leading role in establishing the information security management system (ISMS) at NTNU. This talk will present the section and how it contributes to making the university a more secure environment for all. Furthermore, we will provide a picture of the operational capacity for cybersecurity of NTNU SOC, including the technology choices and the roadmap of building a scalable sensor network. Based on the operational capability, the talk will also provide some insight into the current risks and trends that NTNU is facing in the cyber domain. Finally, we will present how the digital security section is cooperating with academia and possible venues for further collaboration.

About the Speaker : Christoffer Hallstensen has got a Bachelor and Master degree in information security from NTNU Gjøvik specializing in digital forensics. He is currently working as a senior security analyst at the NTNU Digital Security Section in Gjøvik, where he is the team leader for the security operations center (SOC). Academically he is affiliated with the NTNU Digital Forensics research group where he wrote his masters about intrusion detection and situational awareness. He has previously worked as a security consultant for Gjøvik university college and NTNU before the establishment of the digital security section.

Gaute Wangen has got a Bachelor, Masters and Ph.D. degree in information security from NTNU Gjøvik. He is currently working as a senior adviser at the NTNU Digital Security Section at Gjøvik, where he conducts, researches, and teaches information security risk assessments. He has previously worked as a special adviser on information security in Healthcare, working with governance and risk management. Gaute is a Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA).

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NISlecture 2018/2 (31.01.2017, 12.15-13.00 in 2/3 Eureka)

Title: Biometric Recognition: What’s Next?

Speaker: Anil Jain, Michigan State University, US

Abstract: Biometric recognition refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their physiological and behavioral characteristics such as fingerprint, face, iris, and voice. The first scientific paper on automated fingerprint matching was published by Mitchell Trauring in the journal Nature in 1963, which led to the first Automatic Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in the late 1970s for law enforcement and forensic agencies. Since then, biometrics has mushroomed, from large-scale national ID programs (India’s Aadhaar with 1.2 billion enrolment) to mobile phone unlock and payment. While state-of the-art biometric systems can accurately recognize individuals based on biometric trait(s) acquired from cooperative users under controlled conditions, one of the foremost challenges is the design of algorithms for recognizing an uncooperative person under unconstrained imaging conditions (e.g., fingerprints at crime scenes and faces in a surveillance video). In addition, we need guidance on fundamental issues such as distinctiveness and persistence of biometric traits. There are larger issues such as usability, template security, spoof attacks, privacy, searching billions of identities, and biometrics for social good that need solutions.

About the Speaker : Anil Jain is a distinguished professor of Computer Science at Michigan State University. He is a Fellow of the ACM and IEEE and is a recipient of Guggenheim, Humboldt, Fulbright, and King-Sun Fu awards. He served as editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence and was a member of the United States Defense Science Board, Forensic Science Standards Board and AAAS latent fingerprint study. Jain is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and the Indian National Academy of Engineering.
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NISlecture 2018/1 (23.02.2017, 12.15-13.00 in K105)

Title: TBD

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TDB.

About the Speaker : TBD

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NISlecture 2018/1 (27.04.2017, 12.15-13.00 in K105)

Title: TBD

Speaker: TBD

Abstract: TDB.

About the Speaker : TBD

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